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FAQ

Will No-fault insurance pay for help around the house if I am so injured that I can't do household tasks?

REPLACEMENT SERVICES OR HOMEMAKER SERVICES:

You can be compensated for hiring someone to complete household tasks if you are not able to complete them as a result of injuries you sustained in an automobile crash.

To qualify for no fault replacement services, the claimant is not required to be a full-time homemaker, nor does she/he need to show out-of-pocket expenditures. You can receive up to $200 per week for replacement services such as housecleaning, child care, yard work and snow removal, even if the homemaker was or is employed outside the home. The person completing these services does not need to be a licensed provider of services. Rather, the provider of replacement services can be your spouse, adult child, another family member or even a friend. [Minnesota Statutes 65B.44]

When will No Fault pay for this Benefit ?

This benefit does not kick in right away, however. This benefit is calculated as follows:  There are no replacement benefits paid until eight days after the crash.  The benefits start on day EIGHT. These benefits are subject to maximum compensation of $200 per week.

How do I prove up the time spent on doing the activities that I can't do any longer and that I have had to hire someone else to perform? 

Be sure to keep close track of your costs for replacement services.  Sit down and make a list of activities you performed before the injury and the time involved. Then add to that list the activities you cannot do as a result of the accident and add the name of the person now performing those tasks, and the time involved as well as any cost to you.

What does "reasonable value" of services mean?

If your spouse or someone close to you is now performing replacement services, you may pay them with a check for the "reasonable value" of the services. Give that information to your no-fault adjuster, who will reimburse you. "Reasonable value" would be considered the hourly "going rate" for work described above and in most regions $10.00 to $15.00 per hour is an acceptable "going rate." Ask your adjuster if the going rate is higher than $10.00 per hour.

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